1. positivedoodles:

requested by indie-tofu

love this!

    positivedoodles:

    requested by indie-tofu

    love this!

    Reblogged from: positivedoodles
  2. Thank you lovely followers!

  3. rhamphotheca:

    Eddy, a Southern Three-banded Armadillo (Tolypeutes matacus), from South America, rolls up into a ball as it is shown to visitors for the first time since its birth on 26 September at the Bergzoo in Halle, Germany… then unrolls.

    Photograph: Imago/Barcroft Media

    (via: Guardian UK)

    Real life pokemon :P

    Reblogged from: talkzoology
  4. This climate change poem brought world leaders to tears

    Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner was selected from over 500 civil society representatives at the UN Climate Summit meeting last weekend. The 26-year-old Marshall Islands native gave an impassioned speech and recited her powerful poem, “Dear Matafele Peinem.”

    An official Twitter account tweeted the poem out, saying that it had moved the UN representatives to tears.

    Jetnil-Kijiner is the co-founder of the environmental NGO, Jo-JiKuM. The NGO’s mission is to empower and educate the youth towards environmental issues, specifically relating to climate change. The Marshal Islands are a front line community when it comes to the devastation of climate change. The island with the highest altitude lies only two meters above sea level, so rising sea levels mean annihilation for the island nation.

    “To tackle (climate change), we need a radical change of course,” Jetnil-Kijiner explains. “This isn’t easy, I know. It means ending carbon pollution within my lifetime. It means supporting those of us most affected to prepare for unavoidable climate impacts. And it means taking responsibility for irreversible loss and damage caused by greenhouse gas emissions.”

  5. ryannotbrian:

Good Morning!

Cute :)

    ryannotbrian:

    Good Morning!

    Cute :)

    Reblogged from: ryannotbrian
  6. Excited!! :)

  7. dynamicoceans:

Green sea turtles can stay under water for as long as five hours even though the length of a feeding dive is usually five minutes or less. Their heart rate slows to conserve oxygen: nine minutes may elapse between heartbeats. Source

Amazing fact!

    dynamicoceans:

    Green sea turtles can stay under water for as long as five hours even though the length of a feeding dive is usually five minutes or less. Their heart rate slows to conserve oxygen: nine minutes may elapse between heartbeats. Source

    Amazing fact!

    Reblogged from: dynamicoceans
  8. nubbsgalore:

    photos by richard austin of some of the hedgehogs at the secret world wildlife rescue in somerset, england. (see also: more precious lil woodland buddies)

    so cute!!

    (Erinaceus europaeus)

    Reblogged from: togivelifeameaning
  9. Amazing footage of a cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) in Plymouth by Kat Brown

  10. The survival of the sea turtle - Scott Gass

  11. The secret life of plankton - Thierney Thys

  12. Taking science primetime - Riley Elliott

    Inspirational talk about changing public perception of sharks by combining science with visually stimulating imagery. Increased pressure on the government from the public means conservation will happen faster.

  13. Positive cuttle <3

    Positive cuttle <3

    Reblogged from: ilovecephalopods
  14. Last year CITES voted to protect 5 species of shark and 2 species of manta rays. As of 14th September 2014 these protection measures are now in place.

    End shark finning!

  15. dynamicoceans:

Whale Pelvic Bones Actually Do Have a Purpose
Scientists argue in a paper that pelvic bones certainly do have a purpose and that they’re specifically targeted, by selection, for mating.
The muscles that control a cetacean’s penis are attached to the creature’s pelvic bones. Scientists wanted to find out if pelvic bones could be evolutionarily advantageous by impacting the overall amount of control an individual creature has with its penis.
When the scientists compared the relative sizes of pelvic bones with testes, they found that the bigger the testes (relative to body size) the bigger the relative pelvic bones — the competitive mating situation seemed to prompt the development of larger pelvic bones.
To rule out overall skeleton size being the culprit behind the larger pelvic bones, the duo also compared testis size with rib size and found no corresponding increase. xx

Ha! Well now you know! 

    dynamicoceans:

    Whale Pelvic Bones Actually Do Have a Purpose

    Scientists argue in a paper that pelvic bones certainly do have a purpose and that they’re specifically targeted, by selection, for mating.

    The muscles that control a cetacean’s penis are attached to the creature’s pelvic bones. Scientists wanted to find out if pelvic bones could be evolutionarily advantageous by impacting the overall amount of control an individual creature has with its penis.

    When the scientists compared the relative sizes of pelvic bones with testes, they found that the bigger the testes (relative to body size) the bigger the relative pelvic bones — the competitive mating situation seemed to prompt the development of larger pelvic bones.

    To rule out overall skeleton size being the culprit behind the larger pelvic bones, the duo also compared testis size with rib size and found no corresponding increase. xx

    Ha! Well now you know! 

    Reblogged from: dynamicoceans
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