1. earthlynation:

(via 500px / EVOLUTION by Simon Roy)

*cuteness overload*
    Reblogged from: earthlynation
  2. Top photo - 'Pan', another male, was born on 18th of April 2009. 'Pan' is named after the mischievous god from various mythologies. We like Kenneth Grahame's Pan character from 'Wind in the Willows' best, because Grahame's depiction of Pan was as a powerful but secretive nature-god and protector of animals!

    Bottom photo - This is ‘Imp’ – a fitting name for the young male, born on November 29th 2010 at Denver Zoo

    These two adorable aye-ayes recently joined Durrell – and the European Endangered Species Programme (EEP) – from Denver Zoo in the USA. 

    Both are settling in very well, and seem bright and inquisitive, despite finishing the transatlantic crossing, and then the final leg – to Jersey – just yesterday.

    Thanks to the kind assistance of JCS LivestockFlybe, James Cargo and Ocean Air, our newest additions were in safe, caring and expert hands throughout the long journey.

    The aye-aye is arguably the most specialised of all primates, fulfilling an ecological role in its native Madagascar that is the preserve of woodpeckers elsewhere in the world (and the striped-possum in Australia), an example of convergent evolution. In Madagascar, the aye-aye has suffered from persecution – it has been thought to be a a harbinger of death – as well as hunting and been dispatched by coconut farmers worried about their crops. Deforestation is now the biggest threat to the aye-aye, as with all native Malagasy fauna, sadly.

    Pan and Imp are incredibly important, as they bring fresh genes into our ‘safety net’ population, strengthening it and hopefully showing the world what a tragedy it would be to lose these incredible, seldom seen creatures, in the wild.

    Aye Ayes are incredible and magical! I was lucky enough to work with some at Durrell two years ago. But these two babies are gorgeous :D

  3. yazhenvika:

markscherz:

The most suggestive gecko I have ever seen. Good lord.
Ladies.

Adorable!

    yazhenvika:

    markscherz:

    The most suggestive gecko I have ever seen. Good lord.

    Ladies.

    Adorable!

    Reblogged from: yazhenvika
  4. On my own and I’m giving my first ever talk…on the enormous main stage - terrified doesn’t even cover it!

  5. That’s adorable!!

    Reblogged from: togivelifeameaning
  6. cuteanimalfamilies:

(via 500px / crowned lemur by Daniel Münger)

I’ve never seen a crowned lemur before - wow! :) 
Info

    cuteanimalfamilies:

    (via 500px / crowned lemur by Daniel Münger)

    I’ve never seen a crowned lemur before - wow! :) 

    Info

    Reblogged from: togivelifeameaning
  7. endangereduglythings:

    coelasquid:

    romanovan:

    if anyone remembers the story that was making rounds a while back about a 19 year old discovering the solution to cleaning up the pacific garbage patch, that project launched a fundraider which now has 7 days to reach it’s goal.

    They’re at 89% of the 2 million dollar goal!

    This is important. If we can do something about this, we could save millions of aquatic lives.

    Reblogged from: endangereduglythings
  8. Indolent Jellyfish makes beautiful nudibranch, cephalopod and peacock mantis shrimp necklaces. 
I need one of these!

    Indolent Jellyfish makes beautiful nudibranch, cephalopod and peacock mantis shrimp necklaces. 

    I need one of these!

  9. Amazing :P

    Amazing :P

  10. Baby kakapo recovers at the Auckland Zoo

    Click above for photos, so cute and fluffy.

    Also check out Kakapo Recovery a group dedicated to conserving the 150 remaining kakapos - they have volunteer opportunities too!

  11. Where should the roads go? New map offers a solution to the 'Pandora's Box of environmental problems'

    In this map, green-toned areas are priorities for conservation where roads should be avoided if possible, and red-toned areas are priorities for agriculture. Dark-toned areas are “conflict zones”—where environmental and agricultural priorities are likely to clash (light-colored areas are lower priorities for both environment and farming). Magnified images are shown for South America and Sub-Saharan Africa. Image from W. F. Laurance et al., 2014

    The team found many areas where agriculture and livelihoods could be improved significantly with the addition of roads, while exacting a relatively small toll on the environment. 

    However, the authors stress that in many other areas of the world, such as along the Amazon Basin, Southeast Asia, Madagascar, and high-latitude boreal forests, road-building would have huge environmental impacts. 

    Read more

    This is a really useful study to aid planning for the future while minimising environmental impact. Scientific paper is here

  12. Newly-Discovered Deep Sea ‘Mushroom’ Could Re-Write Tree of Life

    Oooh!

    (Also how did it take them since 1986 to look at these specimens?)

  13. sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]



This is one of those incredible inventions which should be installed everywhere.

    sunshinychick:

    futurescope:

    Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

    A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

    [read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

    image

    This is one of those incredible inventions which should be installed everywhere.

    Reblogged from: the-life-of-riley
  14. scienceisbeauty:

    A fascinating and beautiful hydrozoa.

    The Portuguese man-of-war is infamous for its painful sting, but one photographer finds the beauty inside this animal’s dangerous embrace.

    By Jane J. Lee

    Photographs & video: Aaron Ansarov

    A Portrait of the Portuguese Man-of-War (National Geographic)

    Beautiful. Despite appearances it’s not a jellyfish but a siphonophore and it is not one animal but in fact a colony.

    Reblogged from: scienceisbeauty
  15. Reserves and parks not enough to protect nature – David Attenborough

    Nature reserves and national parks are not enough to prevent a catastrophic decline in nature, David Attenborough has told politicians, business leaders and conservationists, saying that every space in Britain from suburban gardens to road verges must be used to help wildlife.

    Britain’s leading commentator on wildlife called for a radical new approach to conservation which did not bemoan the past but embraced the changes brought by climate change and a rapidly growing human population.

    “Where in 1945 it was thought that the way to solve the problem was to create wildlife parks and nature reserves, that is no longer an option. They are not enough now. The whole countryside should be available for wildlife. The suburban garden, roadside verges … all must be used”.

    Attenborough, speaking at the RSPB’sConference for Naturein London, said it was now understood that British wildlife was in grave peril of disappearing. “50% of the hedgehog population has gone in 25 years, 90% of the wildlife meadows have disappeared in 100 years; 60% of all wildlife is diminishing and in danger, with 10% doomed to disappear in the next decades. Nowhere in Britain is unsullied, is unaffected by human action. We now have a huge population living cheek by jowl with nature”.

    But rather than lament the changes, he urged everyone to act. “We know climate change is happening. It is regretted by some but it is also to be embraced. It is causing great changes in the distribution of animals and birds in the countryside. We must take advantage of that. It is very important that we accept there are things coming in … We must recognise that new animals and plants are coming in. Others are moving north. We ought to be giving thought to wildlife corridors … and not think that every new arrival is to be repelled.

    “Because of the complex relationship society has with nature, it is obvious that our response to saving it must extend from every possible quarter too. With an increasing global footprint, mankind is intensifying the crisis for wildlife, but as individuals we can all be part of the solution for saving it too.’’

    Well said Mr Attenborough!

    *edit* Sir Attenborough :P

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